Dying To Live


As the Church around the world remembers the death of Jesus, I am reminded that it is not just a physical death that happened thousands of years ago but a symbolic picture, I think, that God gives me (and you) about what it takes to experience “new life”.

Jesus’ death did not end His ministry but rather it started the restoration/reconciliation of all of creation to the Creator. It was the turning point in humanity where the Kingdom of God invaded the kingdoms of this world. It introduced to us in practical terms what grace, and unconditional love looks like. It was and still is revolutionary.

And it all started with a death.

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

All of us, without exception, have things that need to die within ourselves. It may be pride, arrogance, self-exaltation. But it can also be (as in my case) fear of self exposure, fear of loss, fear of the unknown. But until these things (and multitudes of other negative human traits that reside within each of us), are crucified, we can never really experience what our lives are meant to be.

God has made clear to me what I need to do, yet because I cannot see the end, I fear in the present. And I am not truly free. And I am not trusting and understanding the love of God because this type of fear cannot co-exist with the perfect love of God.

Do I lack faith?

Yes, I do.

But I pray “Lord, I do believe, help my unbelief”.

On this Easter weekend, let us all look within, to examine what is holding us back from experiencing God more deeply, more intimately.  Until you and I, can put to death the thing(s) that enslave our hearts, we will never see resurrection in our lives.

A resurrection that transforms us, our world.


5 thoughts on “Dying To Live

  1. Mark – Thank you for your lovely meaningful words which are so true- and, in my life especially too, – wishing you and yours (and all who are reading your blogs a very joyous Easter

  2. It is the paradox. To gain one’s life one must lose it. Christians seem to try and mask death and despair. But it is only when we embrace death and despair that we can be freed from them and rise to new life. You are not the only one who struggles to find the freedom Christ has promised. But I think that is what life is meant to be–the place we wrestle with these things. Blessed Easter to you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s